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Participate in Research at Holland Bloorview

The Bloorview Research Institute is conducting need-based and ground breaking health research. There are many opportunities for research participation in our ongoing studies.

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Finding the Right Research Study

To find the studies that are relevant to you, use the filters to choose any diagnoses and/or research areas that reflect your interest.  

To view current studies that are not actively recruiting, uncheck the “Actively Recruiting” filter and all Bloorview Research Institute research studies will be displayed.

Diagnosis or medical condition
Research Area
 

List of research studies

Using functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) to measure brain activity during dual-task performance in pediatric concussion patients (Healthy Youth)

Summary:

There is evident alterations in brain function following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). It is of particular concern in the pediatric population with nearly 60% of children continuing to experience symptoms one month after injury. Currently, rehabilitation and return-to-life protocols use subjective self-measures of recovery. However recovery of symptoms may not coincide with recovery of brain function. There is evidence in changes in brain function during attention and memory tasks in youth following mTBI compared to controls. Furthermore, performance on tasks tends to suffer more during dual-task paradigms, where the brain is challenged to complete two tasks concurrently. This evidence comes from the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) which has given some insight into the underlying brain alterations following mTBI's. However, fMRI is expensive and is limited to positions where the patient is required to lie still. An inexpensive and accessible technique, functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), may be an alternate technique to measure brain function. This study will use fNIRS while completing a dual-task paradigm that combines an attention task (Stroop Interference Task) with the Clinical Test of Sensory Integration and Balance (postural sway). We believe that by monitoring brain function using fNIRS we will be able to better understand the underlying alterations caused by mTBI.  

Participate in this study:

Do you want to help us learn what happens to the brain after a concussion? Consider participating in a research study about measuring and analyzing brain activity in youth.

What is this study about:
• We are conducting a research study looking at brain activity in youth during recovery from a concussion.
• We will compare brain activity measured from youth with and without concussion.
• We are using a technology called Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure brain activity.
• There are no known harms associated with NIRS. 


What do children and youth/parents think about their appointments at Holland Bloorview?

Summary:

Our research team thinks that you can help us know what being involved means to children/youth and parents, and how to make appointments involving.

Participate in this study:

Want to help us understand what involvement in outpatient appointments means at Holland Bloorview? Consider participating in Phase 2 of our study.

The embodied experience of returning to school following an acquired brain injury: Body mapping with children following acquired brain injury

Summary:

We're trying to learn more about what it is like for kids to transition back to school after an acquired brain injury. We will used art-style participation to work with kids to learn more about their experiences.

Participate in this study:

Have you or your child experienced an acquired brain injury in the last two years that you were hospitalized for (even one night)? Have you returned to school? Consider participating in an arts-based research study about transitioning back to school after an acquired brain injury.


Feelings About Balance

Summary:

Physical activity improves social life, quality of life, and health. There is evidence that youth with physical disabilities do not try as many different activities as youth who do not have disabilities. One reason might be that they may have lower confidence in their ability to keep their balance during certain activities or settings as a result of their disability.  Right now, we have no way to measure balance confidence in youth.  We think that therapists need to be able to measure balance confidence to know what to work on in their treatment to help youth become more active in physical activities.

As a result, we are making a questionnaire for youth ages 9 to 18 years to be able to tell us how confident they are about their balance. Later on, we will test our new questionnaire to make sure it measures balance confidence accurately, and look at how balance confidence is related to actual balance and participation in physical activities

Feelings About Balance (Typically Developing)

Summary:

Physical activity improves social life, quality of life, and health. There is evidence that youth with physical disabilities do not try as many different activities as youth who do not have disabilities. One reason might be that they may have lower confidence in their ability to keep their balance during certain activities or settings as a result of their disability.  Right now, we have no way to measure balance confidence in youth.  We think that therapists need to be able to measure balance confidence to know what to work on in their treatment to help youth become more active in physical activities.  

As a result, we are making a questionnaire for youth ages 9 to 18 years to be able to tell us how confident they are about their balance. Later on, we will test our new questionnaire to make sure it measures balance confidence accurately, and look at how balance confidence is related to actual balance and participation in physical activities

Bloorview Research Institute

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